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Quotes

Quote #7

Some of them stared at her boots or her cloak, and she knew what they were thinking. With others, she could almost feel their eyes crawling under her leathers; she didn't know what they were thinking, and that scared her even more. (66 Arya 5.16)

Okay, so there's a lot of growing up that gets done in this book. In this chapter, Arya witnesses her dad's execution, which instantly adds a couple years to one's maturity level, we think. But these are still children: it's important to remember that Arya is only nine or ten.

Quote #8

Sansa stared at him, seeing him for the first time. He was wearing a padded crimson doublet patterned with lions and a cloth-of-gold cape with a high collar that framed his face. She wondered how she could ever have thought him handsome. His lips were as soft and red as the worms you found after a rain, and his eyes were vain and cruel. "I hate you," she whispered. (68 Sansa 6.19)

It takes her a while, but Sansa does finally realize that life isn't like a story in a book: talk about a coming of age. Here, newly-mature Sansa realizes that Joffrey isn't the hero of this story, but a villain.

Quote #9

Robb got to his feet slowly and sheathed his sword, and Catelyn found herself wondering whether her son had ever kissed a girl in the godswood. Surely he must have.... he had ridden in battle and killed men with a sword, surely he had been kissed. There were tears in her eyes. She wiped them away angrily. (72 Catelyn 11.61)

Catelyn has her own view of Robb's coming of age. Like many parents, the idea of her child growing up makes Catelyn teary, though Catelyn has additional reasons to be sad. After all, he's maturing in a world of war and violence.

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