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Quotes

Quote #4

That was the most dangerous part, Ned knew. "All justice flows from the king," he told her. (21 Eddard 4.118)

When Tywin Lannister presented Robert with dead bodies, it might've been unjust murder or just war, but the final decision was Robert's. There are laws, of course, but the ultimate judge of all these cases is the king.

Quote #5

"Is this how justice is done in the Vale?" Tyrion roared, so loudly that Ser Vardis froze for an instant. "Does honor stop at the Bloody Gate? You accuse me of crimes, I deny them, so you throw me into an open cell to freeze and starve." He lifted his head, to give them all a good look at the bruises Mord had left on his face. "Where is the king's justice? Is the Eyrie not part of the Seven Kingdoms? I stand accused, you say. Very well. I demand a trial! Let me speak, and let my truth or falsehood be judged openly, in the sight of gods and men." (39 Tyrion 5.91)

Tyrion's opinion of justice sounds pretty modern, doesn't it? We're with him.

Quote #6

"Vengeance?" Ned said. "I thought we were speaking of justice. Burning Clegane's fields and slaughtering his people will not restore the king's peace, only your injured pride." He glanced away before the young knight could voice his outraged protest, and addressed the villagers. "People of Sherrer, I cannot give you back your homes or your crops, nor can I restore your dead to life. But perhaps I can give you some small measure of justice, in the name of our king, Robert." (44 Eddard 11.61)

Ned reminds the people that justice can be made for a crime, but it can't return what was lost. Also, what's the relationship between justice and vengeance?

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