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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

The Two Gentlemen of Verona

Society and Class Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

VALENTINE
What should I see then?
SPEED
Your own present folly and her passing deformity:
for he, being in love, could not see to garter his
hose, and you, being in love, cannot see to put on your hose.
VALENTINE
Belike, boy, then, you are in love; for last
morning you could not see to wipe my shoes.
SPEED
True, sir; I was in love with my bed: I thank you,
you swinged me for my love, which makes me the
bolder to chide you for yours. (2.1.22)

When Speed mocks his master for being blinded by love, Valentine responds by trying to put Speed back in his place. By reminding his servant that he roused him out of bed that morning to polish his shoes, Valentine lets Speed know who's boss.

Quote #5

SPEED
O jest unseen, inscrutable, invisible,
As a nose on a man's face, or a weathercock on a steeple!
My master sues to her, and she hath
taught her suitor,
He being her pupil, to become her tutor.
O excellent device! was there ever heard a better,
That my master, being scribe, to himself should write
the letter? (2.1.31)

Speed may be a servant but he's pretty sharp. When Silvia tricks Valentine into writing her a love letter, Valentine doesn't understand what's going on – Speed has to point it out to him.

Quote #6

I think Crab, my dog, be the sourest-natured
dog that lives: my mother weeping, my father
wailing, my sister crying, our maid howling, our cat
wringing her hands, and all our house in a great
perplexity, yet did not this cruel-hearted cur shed
one tear: (2.3.1)

It seems like the servants in the play often function as foils to the main characters. Here, Lance's relationship with his beloved dog Crab is a parody of some of the romantic relationships in the play. Like Julia, Lance is completely loyal and devoted to his pooch.

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