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Shapes


When your gym teacher tells all you "lazy daisies" to "get in shape," he might want to be a bit more specific. Which shape is he talking about, exactly? A rectangle or a circle? A two-dimensional or three-dimensional one? Gym teachers aren't really known for their specificity, especially if the phrase "drop and give me twenty" is any indication.

When you think of geometry, you can't help but think of shapes. Sure, we need logic and proofs to help us out along the way, but ultimately, 2D and 3D figures get to the heart of what geometry is all about: shapes we can see with our own two eyes.

We're not picky about which shapes we learn about, either. We'll take any shape, from triangles (with 3 sides) to dodecagons (with 12 sides). Actually they don't even have to have sides at all, like circles! We'll even open it up to three-dimensional solids like prisms and cones.

Geometry is about understanding the world around us, and our world takes the shape of…well…shapes. It's about understanding what makes shapes so special, how they're similar or different, and why. We'll learn about the inner workings of isosceles triangles, what makes trapezoids tick, and why spheres are so…well-rounded.

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