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The Epic of Gilgamesh

The Epic of Gilgamesh

by Sinleqqiunninni

Pride Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

"An idiot and a moron should give advice to each other,
but you, Gilgamesh, why have you come to me?
Give advice, Enkidu, you 'son of a fish,' who does not even know his own father,
to the large and small turtles who do not suck their mother's milk!

… Gilgamesh, throat and neck,
I would feed your flesh to the screeching vulture, the eagle, and the vulture!" (5.75-85)

It looks like even fierce monsters have feelings of pride. At least, that's one interpretation of this trash-talk Humbaba dishes out to Gilgamesh and Enkidu before doing battle with them in the Cedar Forest. But isn't it much more likely that insulting these two warriors' pride will make them all the more spoiling for a fight?

Quote #5

"Erect an eternal monument proclaiming …
how Gilgamesh killed(?) Humbaba." (5.241-248)

Here, Enkidu tries to convince Gilgamesh to kill Humbaba by saying that the deed will make him really, really famous. Hm, it sounds like Enkidu knows the way to Gilgamesh's heart. Or something.

Quote #6

"Father, Gilgamesh has insulted me over and over,
Gilgamesh has recounted despicable deeds about me,
despicable deeds and curses!"
Anu addressed Princess Ishtar, saying:
"What is the matter? Was it not you who provoked King Gilgamesh?" (6.82-97)

Basically, Ishtar's dad here is saying that she deserves the insults she got—but Ishtar's pride can't take it. Wounded pride: it's not just for humans.

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