disney_skin
Advertisement
© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
 

Quotes

Quote #4

Lyra had to adjust to her new sense of her own story, and that couldn't be done in a day. To see Lord Asriel as her father was one thing, but to accept Mrs. Coulter as her mother was nowhere near so easy. A couple of months ago she would have rejoiced, of course, and she knew that too, and felt confused. (8.1)

The revelation that Lyra's father is Lord Asriel and her mother is Mrs. Coulter takes some getting used to. Lyra's family becomes part of the way she sees herself.

Quote #5

After two days at sea, Lyra decided that this was the life for her. She had the run of the ship, from the engine room to the bridge, and she was soon on first-name terms with all the crew. Captain Rokeby let her signal to a Hollands frigate by pulling the handle of the steam whistle; the cook suffered her help in mixing plum duff; and only a stern word from John Faa prevented her from climbing the foremast to inspect the horizon from the crow's nest. (10.18)

Just as in her time with the gyptians, Lyra finds herself easily adapting to life on a ship.

Quote #6

"Anyway, there's compensations for a settled form."

"What are they?"

"Knowing what kind of person you are. Take old Belisaria. She's a seagull, and that means I'm a kind of seagull too. I'm not grand and splendid nor beautiful, but I'm a tough old thing and I can survive anywhere and always find a bit of food and company. That's worth knowing, that is. And when your daemon settles, you'll know the sort of person you are."

"But suppose your daemon settles in a shape you don't like?"

"Well, then, you're disconnected, en't you?" (10.25-29)

We learn that daemons are a reflection of characters' selves and souls. Once daemons settle into their permanent state, characters learn something about who they are. What would your daemon be?

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
back to top