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The Graveyard Book

The Graveyard Book

by Neil Gaiman

The Lady on the Grey

Character Analysis

The Lady on the Grey is another super-mysterious figure. She might be a personification of death – which means she’s death in human form, like a prettier version of the Grim Reaper. She says that everybody – and that means you, too – will eventually get to ride her white horse (called a “grey”). This might mean that people ride her horse when they die, or it might mean that there’s a world beyond the graveyard where she carries people.

We don’t know if she serves all the graveyards, or just Bod’s. Either way, she seems to have the last say in matters of the graveyard, and everybody’s in awe of her. When the three hundred active residents of the graveyard are arguing over whether to keep Bod or not, she comes on the scene and decides everything in one sentence. She says, “The dead should have charity" (1.161). She appears once more in the novel, at the Danse Macabre. At the dance, she again favors Bod, by dancing with him and talking with him.

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