The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby
by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Great Gatsby Chapter 8 Quotes Page 2

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Citations follow this format: (Chapter.Paragraph)
Quote 4

Through this twilight universe Daisy began to move again with the season; suddenly she was again keeping half a dozen dates a day with half a dozen men, and drowsing asleep at dawn with the beads and chiffon of an evening dress tangled among dying orchids on the floor beside her bed. And all the time something within her was crying for a decision. She wanted her life shaped now, immediately – and the decision must be made by some force – of love, of money, of unquestionable practicality – that was close at hand. (8.19)

You get the feeling that Fitzgerald thinks that women are fundamentally incapable of making up their minds, and so they have to have some dude do it for them. In that way, The Great Gatsby is really about the fight between Gatsby and Tom: whose vision of America is going to win?

Quote 5

It was after we started with Gatsby toward the house that the gardener saw Wilson's body a little way off in the grass, and the holocaust was complete. (8.112-114)

Myrtle's already dead, but we have to wonder: would Wilson have killed her, too? Is he avenging his wife's honor—or her death?

Quote 6

Usually her voice came over the wire as something fresh and cool, as if a divot from a green golf-links had come sailing in at the office window, but this morning it seemed harsh and dry. (8.49-51)

Talk about dissatisfied. Jordan is the queen of discontent, but now she seems really put out. No wonder—things have taken a very sudden turn for the serious. Plus, without Gatsby, who's going to throw the parties?

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