Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Quotes

Quote #10

"I see," said Lupin thoughtfully. "Well, well [...] I'm impressed." He smiled slightly at the look of surprise on Harry's face. "That suggests that what you fear most of all is – fear. Very wise, Harry." (8.4.53)

See, Lupin totally agrees with us. Harry is very wise for his age. Being afraid of fear, of how it makes you feel and of what it can do to you, is pretty smart.

Quote #11

After about a minute inside it, she burst out again, screaming.

"Hermione!" said Lupin startled. "What's the matter?"

"P-P-Professor McGonagall!" Hermione gasped, pointing into the trunk. "Sh- she said I'd failed everything!"

It took a little while to calm Hermione down. (16.2.12-5)

We love seeing the form that Hermione's abstract fear of failure takes in her boggart. The fact that Hermione, one of the most logical people in the Potter-verse, completely shuts down when confronted with her own "failure" reveals just how intense a fear this is for her.

Quote #12

At that moment, there was a creak overhead. Something had move upstairs. Both of them looked up at the ceiling. Hermione's grip on Harry's arm was so tight he was loosing feeling in his fingers. He raised his eyebrows at her; she nodded again and let go. (17.61)

The silent communication between Hermione and Harry throughout the novel is pretty interesting to watch – these two make really good crime-fighting partners (and partners in crime, for that matter). Hermione and Harry both show their Gryffindor sides here: Hermione is brave enough to release her death grip on Harry and head upstairs with him; Harry is a good enough leader in a crisis to take charge and calm Hermione down.

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