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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

  

by J.K. Rowling

 Table of Contents

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Theme of Youth

We can't forget, in the middle of all of these global themes of good vs. evil, that Goblet of Fire focuses on a bunch of fourteen year olds. In addition to the coming war with Voldemort, these characters must also face a sudden rush of confusing romantic feelings. Not only that, but Ron has to learn a Very Important Lesson about not giving in to jealousy. While these conflicting feelings of love and envy are rushing around, Fred and George decide to keep people laughing with their Ton-Tongue Toffees and Canary Creams. Although Goblet of Fire tackles plenty of adult themes, there's enough teen angst and wacky hijinks to keep Goblet of Fire from getting too heavy.

Questions About Youth

  1. In what ways is life at Hogwarts like life at any school? Do you recognize aspects of your own school experience in J.K. Rowling's depiction of Hogwarts?
  2. What changes do Harry, Ron, and Hermione undergo in Goblet of Fire now that they are fourteen years old? What aspects of teenage life does Rowling choose to depict in this novel? Does she leave anything out?
  3. How do young characters like Dudley Dursley or Draco Malfoy reproduce the behaviors of their parents? Are there characters in Goblet of Fire who don't reflect their upbringing? Where does J.K. Rowling seem to stand on the question of nature vs. nurture?

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