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Quotes

Quote #4

"You can laugh," Luna said, her voice rising, apparently under the impression that Parvati and Lavender were laughing at what she had said rather than what she was wearing, "but people used to believe there were no such things as the Blibbering Humdinger or the Crumple-Horned Snorkack!"

"Well, they were right, weren't they?" said Hermione impatiently. "There weren't any such things as the Blibbering Humdinger or the Crumple-Horned Snorkack."

Luna gave her a withering look and flounced away, radishes swinging madly. Parvati and Lavender were not the only ones hooting with laughter now.

"D'you mind not offending the only people who believe me?" Harry asked Hermione as they made their way into class. (13.113-116)

Luna believes in Harry wholeheartedly, and it's thanks to her support that he manages to get his interview published in The Quibbler. But she is also so eccentric that people feel no remorse about making fun of her openly. Indeed, in one of her last appearances in the book, she is going around the school pinning up notices for her lost clothes and books because her own classmates have hidden them. She takes all of this bullying in stride and remains absolutely true to her own convictions, though, which is admirable (even if she does seem, well, a bit loony). What do you make of Luna's character? Does she remind you of anyone you know? Does she seem realistic or recognizable to you? What does Luna add to Book 5 as a character?

Quote #5

Don't sit there grinning like you know better than I do, I was there, wasn't I? [...] I know what went on, all right? And I didn't get through any of that because I was brilliant at Defense Against the Dark Arts, I got through it all because – because help came at the right time, or because I guessed right – but I just blundered through it all, I didn't have a clue what I was doing – STOP LAUGHING! (15.245)

When Hermione asks Harry to lead their Defense Against the Dark Arts club, he freaks out. He doesn't want to take credit for everything that has happened to him. He claims that he survived all of his battles with Voldemort through luck, because he "guessed right." But when he first sees Ron's prefect badge, Harry is secretly outraged because he has stood against Voldemort and Ron hasn't – doesn't he deserve a little credit? Harry's about-face as he starts feeling embarrassment about his achievements demonstrates that he is incredibly moody these days. But we have to ask: why is Harry protesting so much at Ron and Hermione's faith in him? Why does he deny their enthusiasm at his skills? Where is this sudden protest from Harry coming from, do you think?

Quote #6

"Winky is still drinking lots, sir," he said sadly, his enormous round green eyes, large as tennis balls, downcast. "She still does not care for clothes, Harry Potter . Nor do the other house-elves. None of them will clean Gryffindor Tower any more, not with the hats and socks hidden everywhere, they finds them insulting, sir. Dobby does it all himself, sir, but Dobby does not mind, sir, for he always hopes to meet Harry Potter and tonight, sir, he has got his wish!" Dobby sank into a deep bow again. (18.145)

Dobby reveals what we have all guessed: that Hermione's knitted hats and socks have not freed a single house-elf. The interesting thing about Dobby is that he is a free elf, but he has still not moved completely beyond house-elf nature. It's just that he has chosen his own master, and that master is Harry Potter. He still regards Harry with the same kind of slavish devotion that Kreacher lavishes on Mrs. Black's portrait and memory. Dobby is different from the rest of his kind, but he's still a house-elf – he's not all that changed.

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