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Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

by J.K. Rowling

Contrasting Regions Theme

In the great tradition of many fantasists, Rowling describes a secret, magical world hidden within plain old England. Muggles, or non-magic people, go about their daily lives, while wizards and witches hide in plain sight. Platforms, doors, and all kinds of hidden portals appear where none should exist, and transmit people to the far more exciting little world waiting at Hogwarts. Non-magical England is categorized as not that imaginative, exciting, or interesting; it's full of dull, narrow-minded people leading dull, narrow-minded lives. Magic England is the total opposite: everything about it is tinged with a sense of wonder. It's a place where children can be heroes, and where ordinary kids can discover the secret talents they never knew they always had.

Questions About Contrasting Regions

  1. What elements of the "regular" world seem weirder than elements of the magic world?
  2. If you could include one element from the magic world in your life, what would it be?
  3. How much does magic affect Muggle life?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

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