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Heat
Heat
by H.D.

Heat Analysis

Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay

Form and Meter

Free Verse "Heat" is a typical Imagist poem. It's short, concise, and it's got some pretty intense and evocative images. It's also written in free verse, which means that it doesn't have a regular...

Speaker

We don't know much about the speaker in this poem. We don't know our speaker's name, and actually, we don't know out speaker's gender. (Though, we refer to the speaker as a "she" throughout this gu...

Setting

This poem is not explicit about its setting. What we do know is that the weather is pretty darn hot. Rather than a particular setting, then, this poem creates a particular environment against which...

Sound Check

"Heat" is a short and dense poem and it's frickin' awesome to listen to. When you read it silently to yourself, you might miss out on the poem's subtle repetitions, so be sure to read it out loud....

What's Up With the Title?

This poem's called "Heat" and—no surprises here—this poem's all about heat. And whether you take "heat" to refer to a swelteringly hot late-summer afternoon, or whether you take "heat" to refer...

Calling Card

ImageryH.D. is known for her imagery for good reason: it's awesome, and it's visceral. (There's a good reason we call her an "Imagist"!) In just thirteen short lines, H.D. transports us to that ho...

Tough-o-Meter

(3) Base CampThis poem's not too tough to understand: it's hot! The speaker wants to cool down! Still, we get it, we really do: sometimes, the poems that are easiest to understand can be tricky to...

Trivia

H.D.'s first love was fellow Imagist poet Ezra Pound. "What's better than Ezra?," we always say. (Source.) H.D. used the metaphor of the "bell-jar" to describe feeling trapped decades before Sylvia...

Steaminess Rating

PGIf you're in the mood, you can read some sexiness into "Heat"—perhaps H.D. is referring not just to the weather, but also to sexual desire. This reading is a good one, but it's not the only one...

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