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Lady Mortimer

Character Analysis

Lady Mortimer is the wife of Mortimer, an Englishman who betrays his country by marrying her and joining her father's (Glendower's) forces in Wales. Lady Mortimer has no printed speaking lines in the play, but she sings a song in Welsh and her father translates her speech to her husband. Although she cannot communicate to her husband with words, Mortimer says they understand each other's loving looks. Hotspur's reaction to Lady Mortimer's speech is significant because it emphasizes her foreignness.

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