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Analysis

The House of the Seven Gables Allusions & Cultural References

When authors refer to other great works, people, and events, it’s usually not accidental. Put on your super-sleuth hat and figure out why.

Literary and Philosophical References

  • The New England Primer (1777) (2.15)
  • Chanticleer (rooster name used in medieval tales) (6.5, 6.6, 10.10-11, 10.13, 12.5, 14.35, 21.11)
  • Alexander Pope, " The Rape of the Lock " (8.3)
  • Richard Steele (editor), The Tatler (1709-1711) (8.3)
  • John Dryden, Miscellanies (8.3)
  • Rasselas (8.3)
  • Charles Fourier, French social reformer (10.21, 12.6)
  • Alain-René Lesage, Gil Blas (12.6)
  • John Bunyan, The Pilgrim's Progress ("Giant Despair in pursuit of Christian and Hopeful") (16.34)
  • John Milton, Comus (18.10)
  • Virgil, The Aeneid ("the golden branch, that gained Aeneas and the Sibyl admittance into Hades") (19.1)
  • William Shakespeare, Hamlet (19.22)

Historical References

Biblical References

Mythological References

  • Aeolus, Roman god of the wind (2.13)
  • Midas (3.1, 7.4)
  • Lar, Roman god of the home (7.4)
  • Father Time (8.1)
  • Ixion, mythological Greek king (8.12)
  • Hymettus, a mountain range in ancient Greece known for its honey (10.5)

Pop Culture References

  • Edward Greene Malbone, American painter of miniature portraits (2.3, 4.11, 7.21)
  • Jim Crow (2.10, 3.32, 3.35, 3.37)
  • Oak-Hall Store (Boston) (3.3)
  • Animal magnetism (aka hypnotism) (5.58)
  • Mesmerism (a.k.a. hypnotism) (12.5, 17.36)
  • Claude Lorrain, French landscape painter (13.53, 13.63, 13.67)
  • Graham's Magazine (14.4)
  • Godey's Lady's Book (14.4)
  • Moll Pitcher, famous Massachusetts clairvoyant and fortune-teller (18.10)
  • Niccolò Paganini, Italian violinist and composer (19.44)
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