Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
by Mark Twain

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Chapter 15 Quotes Page 1

How we cite the quotes:
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Quote 1

It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger; but I done it, and I warn't ever sorry for it afterwards, neither. I didn't do him no more mean tricks, and I wouldn't done that one if I'd a knowed it would make him feel that way. (15.49)

Huck isn't happy about having to apologize to a black man, but he does it. It's super impressive for the time and place that he ends up apologizing, but we can see that he's still, well, racist—he's just less racist than everyone else. Is Twain holding him up as an example, or does Twain want us to do better?

Quote 2

"Well, this is too many for me, Jim. I hain't seen no fog, nor no islands, nor no troubles, nor nothing. I been setting here talking with you all night till you went to sleep about ten minutes ago, and I reckon I done the same. You couldn't a got drunk in that time, so of course you've been dreaming." (15.34)

Huck won't lie to his dad, but he has not problem lying to and deceiving Jim. He may not want to send Jim back to slavery, but it doesn't seem like Jim rates quite as highly as a white man in Huck's moral scale.

Quote 3

"Goodness gracious, is dat you, Huck? En you ain' dead—you ain' drownded—you's back agin? It's too good for true, honey, it's too good for true. Lemme look at you chile, lemme feel o' you. No, you ain' dead! you's back agin, 'live en soun', jis de same ole Huck—de same ole Huck, thanks to goodness!" (15.19)

Huck may have to be educated into friendship with Jim, but Jim seems to come by it naturally. Just check out his sweet way of talking: "honey," "chile," "same ole Huck"—we don't really know why Jim seems to like him so much, but it shows what a good friend he's ready to be.

Next Page: Chapter 16 Quotes
Previous Page: Chapter 14 Quotes

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