Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
by Mark Twain

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Chapter 4 Quotes Page 1

How we cite the quotes:
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Quote 1

"Please take it," says I, "and don't ask me nothing—then I won't have to tell no lies." (4.15)

Oh, Huck. There's nothing like the open road to rob a boy of his scruples. Pretty soon this kid is going to be lying like Frank W. Abagnale.

Quote 2

At first I hated the school, but by and by I got so I could stand it. Whenever I got uncommon tired I played hookey, and the hiding I got next day done me good and cheered me up. So the longer I went to school the easier it got to be. I was getting sort of used to the widow's ways, too, and they warn't so raspy on me. Living in a house and sleeping in a bed pulled on me pretty tight mostly, but before the cold weather I used to slide out and sleep in the woods sometimes, and so that was a rest to me. I liked the old ways best, but I was getting so I liked the new ones, too, a little bit. The widow said I was coming along slow but sure, and doing very satisfactory. She said she warn't ashamed of me. (4.2)

Huck may be more comfortable sleeping in the woods, but he's starting to think that this civilization thing isn't so bad. And what's up with liking the "hiding" ("beating") that he gets for playing hookey? Why does being punished cheer him up?

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Previous Page: Chapter 3 Quotes

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