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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

  

by Mark Twain

Current Events & Pop Culture

Available to teachers only as part of the Teaching Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teacher Pass


Teaching Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teacher Pass includes:

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Sample of Current Events & Pop Culture


Is Huck Finn Still Relevant Today?

Mark Twain scholar Shelley Fisher Fishkin's essay on why Huck Finn matters today (from PBS Teachers).



Excerpt

"If W.E.B. Du Bois was right that the problem of the twentieth century is the color line, one would never know it from the average secondary-school syllabus, which often avoids issues of race almost completely. Like a Trojan horse, however, Huck Finn can slip into the American literature classroom as a 'classic,' only to engulf students in heated debates about prejudice and racism, conformity, autonomy, authority, slavery and freedom. It is a book that puts on the table the very questions the culture so often tries to bury, a book that opens out into the complex history that shaped it -- the history of the ante-bellum era in which the story is set, and the history of the post-war period in which the book was written -- and it requires us to address that history as well. Much of that history is painful. Indeed, it is to avoid confronting the raw pain of that history that black parents sometimes mobilize to ban the novel. Brushing history aside, however, is no solution to the larger challenge of dealing with its legacy. Neither is placing the task of dealing with it on one book.

We continue to live, as a nation, in the shadow of racism while being simultaneously committed, on paper, to principles of equality. As Ralph Ellison observed in our interview, it is this irony at the core of the American experience that Mark Twain forces us to confront head-on."