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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

  

by Mark Twain

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Huckleberry Finn Quotes

Huckleberry Finn > Pap

Quote 19

"I hain't got no money."

"It's a lie. Judge Thatcher's got it. You git it. I want it."

"I hain't got no money, I tell you. You ask Judge Thatcher; he'll tell you the same." (5.19-5.24)

Huck has no problem lying later in the book, but here he's got some major scruples about lying to his dad. Why? It's not like Pap is overly concerned with his own honesty. (Check out Pap's "Character Analysis" for more.)

Huckleberry Finn

Quote 20

When we got home Aunt Sally was that glad to see me she laughed and cried both, and hugged me, and give me one of them lickings of hern that don't amount to shucks, and said she'd serve Sid the same when he come. (41.21)

Let's get this straight: Pap's beating are bad, obviously. But "lickings" can also be a way to show love? Let's just chalk this up to "things change."

Huckleberry Finn

Quote 21

And so, take it all around, we made a good haul. When we was ready to shove off we was a quarter of a mile below the island, and it was pretty broad day; so I made Jim lay down in the canoe and cover up with the quilt, because if he set up people could tell he was a nigger a good ways off. (9.21)

Here's something to think about: Huck has a lot more leeway than Jim, because he can lie. But Jim's body always speaks the truth: he's a slave. Jim couldn't lie the way Huck does even if he wanted to.

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