Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Quotes

Quote #13

AFTER breakfast I wanted to talk about the dead man and guess out how he come to be killed, but Jim didn't want to. He said it would fetch bad luck; and besides, he said, he might come and ha'nt us; he said a man that warn't buried was more likely to go a-ha'nting around than one that was planted and comfortable. That sounded pretty reasonable, so I didn't say no more; but I couldn't keep from studying over it and wishing I knowed who shot the man, and what they done it for. (10.1)

Jim uses superstition to deceive Huck, the way the duke and the king later use religion to deceive others.

Quote #14

"Now you think it's bad luck; but what did you say when I fetched in the snake-skin that I found on the top of the ridge day before yesterday? You said it was the worst bad luck in the world to touch a snake-skin with my hands. Well, here's your bad luck! We've raked in all this truck and eight dollars besides. I wish we could have some bad luck like this every day, Jim." "

Never you mind, honey, never you mind. Don't you git too peart. It's a-comin'. Mind I tell you, it's a-comin'." (10.3, 10.4)

Jim refuses to waver in his superstitious beliefs, even in the face of contrasting evidence.

Quote #15

Jim told me to chop off the snake's head and throw it away, and then skin the body and roast a piece of it. I done it, and he eat it and said it would help cure him. He made me take off the rattles and tie them around his wrist, too. He said that that would help. (10.7)

Although he is skeptical, Huck still humors Jim and his superstitions. This goes along with his general respect for others’ beliefs, and his open-minded attitude regarding different ways of looking at the world.

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