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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain

Youth Quotes Page 5

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #13

"NO, I ain't out of my HEAD; I know all what I'm talking about. We DID set him free – me and Tom. We laid out to do it, and we DONE it. And we done it elegant, too." He'd got a start, and she never checked him up, just set and stared and stared, and let him clip along, and I see it warn't no use for ME to put in. "Why, Aunty, it cost us a power of work – weeks of it – hours and hours, every night, whilst you was all asleep. And we had to steal candles, and the sheet, and the shirt, and your dress, and spoons, and tin plates, and case-knives, and the warming-pan, and the grindstone, and flour, and just no end of things, and you can't think what work it was to make the saws, and pens, and inscriptions, and one thing or another, and you can't think HALF the fun it was. And we had to make up the pictures of coffins and things, and nonnamous letters from the robbers, and get up and down the lightning-rod, and dig the hole into the cabin, and made the rope ladder and send it in cooked up in a pie, and send in spoons and things to work with in your apron pocket –" (42.33)

Tom cannot recognize that others do not share his brand of juvenile logic.

Quote #14

"Well, that IS a question, I must say; and just like women! Why, I wanted the ADVENTURE of it; and I'd a waded neck-deep in blood to – goodness alive, AUNT POLLY!" (42.49)

Tom marvels at the way women think, not recognizing that his own brand of logic is completely absurd.

Quote #15

The first time I catched Tom private I asked him what was his idea, time of the evasion? – what it was he'd planned to do if the evasion worked all right and he managed to set a nigger free that was already free before? And he said, what he had planned in his head from the start, if we got Jim out all safe, was for us to run him down the river on the raft, and have adventures plumb to the mouth of the river, and then tell him about his being free, and take him back up home on a steamboat, in style, and pay him for his lost time, and write word ahead and get out all the niggers around, and have them waltz him into town with a torchlight procession and a brass-band, and then he would be a hero, and so would we. But I reckoned it was about as well the way it was. (43.1)

Tom’s plans have the grandiose nature of a child’s dreams.

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