unigo_skin
© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
 

Themes

Little Words, Big Ideas

Awe and Amazement

In The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Hugo’s got quite the hard knock life for such a little boy—he has to work on clocks, he lives in a train station, he’s orphaned, and the list goes on. But he...

Friendship

It’s probably putting it lightly to say that Hugo doesn’t have too many friends. And when he finally does meet someone his age—Isabelle—they don’t get off to the best start. There are a l...

Family

Poor Hugo. In The invention of Hugo Cabret, he doesn’t have the best track record with family; after all, he’s orphaned and his Uncle Claude was a real jerk, if we do say so ourselves. He’s p...

Transformation

It’s true that Hugo transforms over the course of The Invention of Hugo Cabret—after all, we see actual images of him as a boy, and then as a boy with a haircut who looks older and more put tog...

Memory and the Past

For a man who works at the train station, Georges Méliès sure has a problem with baggage in The Invention of Hugo Cabret. And no, we’re not talking about literal suitcases or backpacks; we’re...

Isolation

Georges Méliès used to be a legend (in fact, is still a legend) in the film industry, and yet he doesn’t talk to anyone that he used to work with. He doesn’t watch any of his old movies. In f...

Art and Culture

Mais, oui. Where better to discuss art and culture than in a book that’s set in Paris, France? Seriously though, The Invention of Hugo Cabret touches on some serious high culture, considering it'...

Truth

If the saying goes, “The truth will set you free,” then Hugo and Isabelle must really be jonesing for some freedom, because they are unrelenting in their search for the truth about the automato...
Advertisement
Advertisement
back to top