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Themes

Well, duh. Of course "[i carry your heart with me(i carry it in my heart]" is about love. But we're not talking about ruby cheeks and flowing hair. That stuff stays in the Renaissance where it belongs. Instead, Cummings focuses on the unity of love and how it connects not only these two lovers, but also the world at large.

Questions About Love

  1. Why is this poem not your typical love poem? How does Cummings visually and contextually revolutionize the way we talk and think about love?
  2. How is the third stanza different from the rest of the poem in terms of its perspective on love? How does Cummings use punctuation to further the poem's theme of love and unity?
  3. How does the speaker's voice contribute to this theme of love? Does it sound like your typical lovesick puppy, or something different? Why do you think so?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Love isn't just about getting the girl in Cummings's poem, but rather is focused on the idea of unity and the world at large.

Nice try, but let's flip that script. Even though the speaker refers to love unifying the world, the poem's focus is more about the love he carries within him at all times.

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