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The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man

  

by H.G. Wells

The Invisible Man Identity Quotes

How we cite our quotes: (Chapter.Paragraph)

Quote #10

When at last the crowd made way for Kemp to stand erect, there lay, naked and pitiful on the ground, the bruised and broken body of a young man about thirty. His hair and brow were white—not grey with age, but white with the whiteness of albinism—and his eyes were like garnets. His hands were clenched, his eyes wide open, and his expression was one of anger and dismay.

"Cover his face!" said a man. (28.28-9)

When the Invisible Man dies, the strangers in Burdock get their first look at him, and they are not happy with what they see. (We wonder how the Iping villagers would feel, since they knew him a little better.) Is this image of the dead albino the final identity of Griffin? Is this how we want to remember him? Angry and dismayed? And how does this revelation of what he looked like add to his identity?

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