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Island of the Blue Dolphins

Island of the Blue Dolphins

by Scott O'Dell

Language and Communication Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

"Wintscha," she said.

I had not heard words spoken for so long that they sounded strange to me, yet they were good to hear, even though it was an enemy who spoke them. (21.31-32)

Why is Karana happy to hear Tutok speak. Isn't Tutok an enemy Aleut?

Quote #5

She touched the necklace, giving the word for it, and I gave mine. We pointed out other things – the spring, the cave, a gull flying, the sun and the sky, Rontu asleep – trading the names for them and laughing because they were so different. We sat there on the rock until the sun was in the west and played this game. Then Tutok rose and made a gesture of farewell. (22.10)

Karana and the Aleut girl make friends by learning each other's language. How does this go against her father's opinion that the Aleuts don't understand friendship? How is communication important to their friendship?

Quote #6

Below me, Rontu was running along the cliff, barking at screaming gulls. Pelicans were chattering as they fished the blue water. Far off I could hear the bellow of a sea elephant. But suddenly, as I thought of Tutok, the island seemed very quiet. (22.33)

Why is Karana lonely again?  Aren't the animals noisy enough to keep her company? Notice the verbs in this selection: "barking," "screaming," "bellow." What's their significance? How are they different from the noises Tutok makes?

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