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Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

by Sir Walter Scott

Ivanhoe Chapter 30 Summary

The epigraph for this chapter is from an "Old Play," Scott tells us. But the author is really none other than Scott himself (source). It describes the deathbed of an old sinner, Anselm. Because Anselm is a sinner, his death is not a peaceful one.
De Bracy asks Bois-Guilbert if Front-de-Boeuf is dead.
Bois-Guilbert says he's not dead yet, but he will be soon.
De Bracy thinks they should give the prisoners over to the outlaws.
Bois-Guilbert argues that surrender would be a shame to both of them.
De Bracy and Bois-Guilbert return to the walls to defend the castle bravely.
Meanwhile, Front-de-Boeuf is lying in bed in agony.
Front-de-Boeuf knows that he's dying, but there is no priest nearby to take his last confession.
A woman's voice interrupts his internal monologue.
It's Ulrica, come to remind Front-de-Boeuf of all of his sins: rebellion, rape, and murder.
She accuses him of encouraging Prince John to rebel against his father (King Henry II) and his brother (King Richard).
She reminds him that he murdered his own father, Reginald Front-de-Boeuf Senior.
She curses him for helping murder her father and brothers at Torquilstone.
Ulrica refuses to let Front-de-Boeuf die in peace.
His attendants are all too busy fighting to help him now.
Ulrica also tells Front-de-Boeuf that she has set the castle on fire.
It's burning even now.
Everything Front-de-Boeuf has fought for is in ruins.
Ulrica leaves Front-de-Boeuf alone to think about his terrible sins.
Front-de-Boeuf sees hell opening up in front of him.
He dies raving in pain and guilt.

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