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Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

by Sir Walter Scott

Ivanhoe Chapter 38 Summary

This chapter's epigraph goes back to good old Shakespeare: Act I, Scene 1 of <em>Richard II</em>. In this passage, the character Henry Bolingbroke has challenged Thomas Mowbray to a duel by throwing his glove to the ground.
Rebecca's bravery impresses even Beaumanoir.
Beaumanoir tells her to repent for being a witch.
If she repents and converts to Christianity, she can go to a strict nunnery for the rest of her life to think about her sins.
Rebecca refuses to give up the religion of her forefathers.
Because Rebecca will not confess to any crime, Beaumanoir agrees to her demand for a trial by combat.
The Templars decide to name Bois-Guilbert as their representative in the combat.
Albert goes over to talk to Bois-Guilbert, to convince him quietly that he <em>has </em>to do this.
At the appointed time for the combat, Rebecca has faith that God will send her a champion.
Beaumanoir offers her a chance to name a messenger.
Rebecca addresses the court, asking if anyone present will help her.
No one volunteers – they are all too frightened of Beaumanoir.
Higg finally stands up, even though he is disabled.
Rebecca asks Higg to go to her father with a scroll, on which she has written a message in Hebrew.
Isaac is waiting in a house near Templestowe for news of his daughter.
Isaac is heartbroken to hear that she has been condemned.
In her letter, Rebecca says she only has one chance: Isaac should send for Ivanhoe, even if he's not be well enough to fight yet.
If Rebecca dies, she wants her father to flee to Spain, which is under Muslim control.
The Muslims will be less cruel to Isaac as a Jew than the Christians of England have been.
Isaac has no choice now but to find Ivanhoe.
Meanwhile, his friend will go to raise money in York so they can pay someone to fight if they have to.
Isaac and the Rabbi depart.
Higg is annoyed that Isaac has not paid him for his message.

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