Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
by Robert Louis Stevenson
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Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Friendship Quotes Page 7

Page (7 of 9) Quotes:   1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9  
How we cite the quotes:
Citations follow this format: (Chapter.Paragraph)
Quote #19

It is one thing to mortify curiosity, another to conquer it; and it may be doubted if, from that day forth, Utterson desired the society of his surviving friend with the same eagerness. He thought of him kindly; but his thoughts were disquieted and fearful. He went to call indeed; but he was perhaps relieved to be denied admittance; perhaps, in his heart, he preferred to speak with Poole upon the doorstep and surrounded by the air and sounds of the open city, rather than to be admitted into that house of voluntary bondage, and to sit and speak with its inscrutable recluse. Poole had, indeed, no very pleasant news to communicate.

The doctor, it appeared, now more than ever confined himself to the cabinet over the laboratory, where he would sometimes even sleep; he was out of spirits, he had grown very silent, he did not read; it seemed as if he had something on his mind. Utterson became so used to the unvarying character of these reports, that he fell off little by little in the frequency of his visits. (6.13)

Mr. Utterson finally begins to doubt Dr. Jekyll’s good character – and is in fact relieved to be denied admittance into his friend’s house.

Quote #20

"These are all very strange circumstances," said Mr. Utterson, "but I think I begin to see daylight. Your master, Poole, is plainly seized with one of those maladies that both torture and deform the sufferer; hence, for aught I know, the alteration of his voice; hence the mask and the avoidance of his friends; hence his eagerness to find this drug, by means of which the poor soul retains some hope of ultimate recovery –God grant that he be not deceived! There is my explanation; it is sad enough, Poole, ay, and appalling to consider; but it is plain and natural, hangs well together, and delivers us from all exorbitant alarms." (8.42)

We’ll go out on a limb and say that this passage may prove that Poole knows Dr. Jekyll better than, or as well as, Mr. Utterson does.

Quote #21

"O, sir," cried Poole, "do you think I do not know my master after twenty years? Do you think I do not know where his head comes to in the cabinet door, where I saw him every morning of my life? No, sir, that thing in the mask was never Dr. Jekyll –God knows what it was, but it was never Dr. Jekyll; and it is the belief of my heart that there was murder done." (8.43)

Poole’s steadfast loyalty to Dr. Jekyll is borne out of twenty years of being his servant, not out of being his friend.

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