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Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde


by Robert Louis Stevenson

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Friendship Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Chapter.Paragraph)

Quote #19

"These are all very strange circumstances," said Mr. Utterson, "but I think I begin to see daylight. Your master, Poole, is plainly seized with one of those maladies that both torture and deform the sufferer; hence, for aught I know, the alteration of his voice; hence the mask and the avoidance of his friends; hence his eagerness to find this drug, by means of which the poor soul retains some hope of ultimate recovery—God grant that he be not deceived! There is my explanation; it is sad enough, Poole, ay, and appalling to consider; but it is plain and natural, hangs well together, and delivers us from all exorbitant alarms." (8.42)

We’ll go out on a limb and say that this passage may prove that Poole knows Dr. Jekyll better than, or as well as, Mr. Utterson does.

Quote #20

"O, sir," cried Poole, "do you think I do not know my master after twenty years? Do you think I do not know where his head comes to in the cabinet door, where I saw him every morning of my life? No, sir, that thing in the mask was never Dr. Jekyll—God knows what it was, but it was never Dr. Jekyll; and it is the belief of my heart that there was murder done." (8.43)

Poole’s steadfast loyalty to Dr. Jekyll is borne out of twenty years of being his servant, not out of being his friend.

Quote #21

The lawyer put it in his pocket. "I would say nothing of this paper. If your master has fled or is dead, we may at least save his credit." (8.97)

Mr. Utterson is concerned with saving his friend’s reputation.

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