Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Characters

Mr. Gabriel Utterson Timeline and Summary

  • Mr. Utterson is out for his usual Sunday afternoon walk with Mr. Enfield when they come across a door that prompts Mr. Enfield to tell a story about a wicked man named Mr. Hyde.
  • Mr. Utterson has heard this name before. When he goes home, he examines Dr. Jekyll’s will, which instructs the entire estate to be handed over to Mr. Hyde.
  • Mr. Utterson’s curiosity is aroused, so he visits Dr. Lanyon and asks him about both Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Dr. Lanyon and Mr. Utterson are two of Dr. Jekyll’s best and oldest friends.
  • Dr. Lanyon has no knowledge of Mr. Hyde, but admits that he is no longer close with Dr. Jekyll.
  • Mr. Utterson’s curiosity is now really aroused, so he stalks the door until he meets Mr. Hyde.
  • They exchange words, and Mr. Utterson comes away thoroughly convinced of Mr. Hyde’s wickedness.
  • Afraid of what kind of hold Mr. Hyde could have over Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Utterson ruminates on his own past sins.
  • He resolves to try and help Dr. Jekyll if he is indeed in trouble.
  • Mr. Utterson goes to dinner at Dr. Jekyll’s house and contrives to stay later.
  • He asks Dr. Jekyll about the will. Dr. Jekyll knows that Mr. Utterson doesn’t like the situation.
  • Mr. Utterson brings up the terrible character of Mr. Hyde, and Dr. Jekyll begs his guest to drop the matter.
  • A year later, a prominent client of Mr. Utterson’s is murdered while carrying documents addressed to Mr. Utterson.
  • Mr. Hyde is responsible for the murder; Mr. Utterson identifies the body and the murder weapon.
  • Mr. Utterson takes a police officer to Mr. Hyde’s house.
  • They talk to the housekeeper and search the house. It is ransacked. Mr. Hyde is nowhere to be found.
  • Mr. Utterson pays a visit to Dr. Jekyll. Mr. Utterson asks if Dr. Jekyll has been harboring Mr. Hyde.
  • Dr. Jekyll says no, and hands Mr. Utterson a letter written by Mr. Hyde.
  • Mr. Utterson has dinner with his head clerk, Mr. Guest, and asks if Mr. Guest would do a handwriting analysis of the letter.
  • Mr. Utterson’s servant enters with a note from Dr. Jekyll.
  • Based on Mr. Guest’s analysis, Mr. Utterson believes that Dr. Jekyll is a forger.
  • Mr. Hyde disappears, and Mr. Utterson is happy. His friend Dr. Jekyll resumes his old, contented ways.
  • On the 8th of January, Mr. Utterson dines at Dr. Jekyll’s with Dr. Lanyon. Everything is still good.
  • Mr. Utterson calls on Dr. Lanyon, who is deathly ill and says he has had a terrible shock.
  • Mr. Utterson notes that Dr. Jekyll is also ill, and Dr. Lanyon promptly shuts down any mention of Dr. Jekyll.
  • Mr. Utterson writes to Dr. Jekyll, asking what the deal is. Dr. Jekyll writes back, confirming that he and Dr. Lanyon are irreconcilable, and that he has resolved to lead a life of complete seclusion from now on.
  • Dr. Lanyon dies, leaving a document in Mr. Utterson’s possession. Mr. Utterson opens the envelope only to find another envelope, this one to be opened only in the event of Dr. Jekyll’s death or disappearance.
  • Mr. Utterson is tempted to open the envelope, but refrains.
  • Mr. Utterson visits Dr. Jekyll frequently, but Poole always tells the same story: Dr. Jekyll has confined himself to the cabinet over the laboratory and refuses to see anyone.
  • Mr. Utterson decreases his visits.
  • Mr. Utterson and Mr. Enfield go for their usual walk.
  • They pass under a window where Dr. Jekyll is sitting.
  • They chat until Dr. Jekyll stops smiling, freaks out, and shuts the window.
  • Mr. Utterson and Mr. Enfield are horrified.

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