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Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Science Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

Mr. Hyde had numbered few familiars –even the master of the servant maid had only seen him twice; his family could nowhere be traced; he had never been photographed; and the few who could describe him differed widely, as common observers will. Only on one point were they agreed; and that was the haunting sense of unexpressed deformity with which the fugitive impressed his beholders. (4.18)

Nearly every character finds it difficult to properly describe Mr. Hyde; he is not exactly human, they all say.

Quote #5

"I never saw a man so distressed as you were by my will; unless it were that hide-bound pedant, Lanyon, at what he called my scientific heresies. O, I know he's a good fellow –you needn't frown –an excellent fellow, and I always mean to see more of him; but a hide-bound pedant for all that; an ignorant, blatant pedant. I was never more disappointed in any man than Lanyon." (3.3)

Science is a serious matter for the gentlemen in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Quote #6

"Well, sir," he said, "here we are, and God grant there be nothing wrong."

"Amen, Poole," said the lawyer. (8.15)

As in many other places in the text, God is invoked in a plea.

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