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Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

by Robert Louis Stevenson

Science Quotes Page 1

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

I had taken a loathing to my gentleman at first sight. So had the child's family, which was only natural. But the doctor's case was what struck me. He was the usual cut and dry apothecary, of no particular age and colour, with a strong Edinburgh accent and about as emotional as a bagpipe. Well, sir, he was like the rest of us; every time he looked at my prisoner, I saw that Sawbones turn sick and white with desire to kill him. (1.8)

We get the first hint of "unnatural" circumstances early in the text.

Quote #2

This little spirit of temper was somewhat of a relief to Mr. Utterson. "They have only differed on some point of science," he thought; and being a man of no scientific passions (except in the matter of conveyancing), he even added: "It is nothing worse than that!" (2.10)

Mr. Utterson is not interested in science and does not value it as a topic of debate; therefore he is (unknowingly) an ideal person to investigate the strange connections between Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Quote #3

Yet his attention had never before been so sharply and decisively arrested; and it was with a strong, superstitious prevision of success that he withdrew into the entry of the court. (2.16)

Mr. Hyde’s footsteps invoke very strong feelings in Mr. Utterson.

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