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Julie of the Wolves

Julie of the Wolves

by Jean Craighead George

Man and the Natural World Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

She awoke with a start a short time later and looked about in puzzlement. The sky vaulted above her. A grass blade tickled her face, and she remembered where she was – up on the frost heave with the wolf pack! Breathing deeply to quell a sense of uneasiness, she finally relaxed, unrolled, and sat up. (1.189)

No matter how beautiful the tundra is, it's still pretty darn terrifying. Just imagine how you would feel if you slept peacefully, forgetting your situation, only to wake up and find yourself lost in an endless expanse of grass. Talk about a nightmare.

Quote #5

Walking the tundra with Kapugen was all laughter and fun. He would hail the blue sky and shout his praise for the grasses and bushes. (2.20)

It's clear that most of Miyax's love and respect for nature comes from being raised by Kapugen, which makes her disappointing reunion with him at the end of the novel all the more shocking.

Quote #6

"Yes, you are Eskimo," he had said. "And never forget it. We live as no other people can, for we truly understand the earth." (2.25)

Time and time again, we get the idea that Eskimos are somehow more dialed into the planet than other people. If we're using Miyax as evidence in support of that theory, then Shmoop would have to agree.

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