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Julius Caesar Art and Culture Quotes

How we cite our quotes: (Act.Scene.Line). Line numbers correspond to the Riverside edition.

Quote #10

Poet
For shame, you generals, what do you mean?
Love and be friends as two such men should be,
For I have seen more years, I'm sure, than ye.
CASSIUS
Ha, ha, how vilely doth this cynic rhyme!
BRUTUS
Get you hence, sirrah! Saucy fellow, hence!
CASSIUS
Bear with him, Brutus. 'Tis his fashion.
BRUTUS
I'll know his humor, when he knows his time.
What should the wars do with these jigging fools?—
Companion, hence!
CASSIUS
Away, away, be gone! (4.3.149-158)

Now this is weird.  What the heck is a poet doing roaming around on a battlefield?  After Brutus and Cassius get into a heated argument, the poet shows up and urges the guys to "love, and be friends." Unfortunately, Brutus and Cassius assume that "jigging fools" don't have anything valuable to say about politics, warfare, or even friendship. But it seems pretty clear that Shakespeare (whose work was important enough that he gained royal patronage from King James I) disagrees.  If you want to know more, go to "Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory" and check out our discussion of "Poets and Teachers." 

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