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Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

  

by William Shakespeare

Challenges & Opportunities

Available to teachers only as part of the Teaching Julius Caesar Teacher Pass


Teaching Julius Caesar Teacher Pass includes:

  • Assignments & Activities
  • Reading Quizzes
  • Current Events & Pop Culture articles
  • Discussion & Essay Questions
  • Challenges & Opportunities
  • Related Readings in Literature & History

Sample of Challenges & Opportunities


It's over 400 years old, but Julius Caesar is still the reigning champ of literature that explores political conspiracy, freedom from tyranny, and the abuses of power. It's also the greatest story about the most notorious backstabbing of all time. So, what's not to like?

Accessibility and Safety
For decades, Julius Caesar was considered the best and "safest" introduction to Shakespeare for ninth grade students because 1) the language is pretty straightforward but not overly simple, which 2) gives students easy access to Shakespeare's trademark literary and dramatic devices, and 3) unlike Romeo and Juliet, there's no sex in Julius Caesar. While it's true that Julius Caesar is one of the best plays for students new to Shakespeare, we think Caesar is much more than just a "safe" text to teach a classroom full of overly stimulated teenagers with raging hormones. Here's why.