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Themes

We're not sure if admiration is actually a good thing in The Kite Runner. The protagonist's intense admiration for his father leads him to some fairly dastardly deeds. In this novel, the flip-side to admiration is jealousy, and jealousy leads to all sorts of trouble. However, the protagonist's best friend offers an example of unflagging admiration, which puts admiration in a better light. His admiration seems more like loyalty and devotion than a jealously-inspiring obsession. Moral of the story: Admire people in moderation.

Questions About Admiration

  1. Do Wali and Kamal admire Assef? Or do they simply fear him? Is their relationship with Assef different than Amir's with Baba's? How so?
  2. Why doesn't Amir admire Rahim Khan as much as he admires his father? What does this tell us about admiration (and its recipients)?
  3. Contrast Amir's admiration for his deceased mother with his admiration for his father.
  4. Does Amir admire his father less in Fremont, California? Or do their poverty and Baba's deteriorating health increase Amir's admiration for his father?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.
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