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Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Themes

It's one thing if your father is a principled man. That's all well and good. We mean, morality is kind of important, right? But what if your father isn't just any man? What if he's a legend, a myth, someone with such force of personality you cower at his very approach? His principles will probably seem like divine mandates, or something. We know we've asked you to imagine a lot. But now imagine that you disregard one of your father's most valued principles. You're crazy with regret. Such an action leads to guilt. It leads to a crash in the Stock Market of Self-Worth. This is pretty much what happens in The Kite Runner.

Questions About Principles

  1. Describe Amir at the end of the novel. Does Amir believe in all of his father's principles? Has he abandoned a few? Which ones does he hold sacred? Does Amir develop his own set of principles?
  2. Does someone like Assef have principles, too?
  3. At times, Baba expresses some fairly strong views about honor and pride. But he also seems dismissive of the conservative Mullah at Amir's school. Is Baba a freethinking liberal or a conservative moralist? Does place matter in this question? Meaning, is Baba a freethinking liberal in Afghanistan but a conservative moralist in California?
  4. Does someone as pure-hearted as Hassan even need principles? Are principles much more useful to flawed men like Baba and Amir?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.
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