unigo_skin
© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
 

Best of the Web

Best of the Web

Websites

Everything Emily

Poetry Foundation's brief but fascinating bio of the elusive lady poet. You can also find useful links to Dickinson's poems online, as well as some articles on other poems, if you're interested.

Hm. The same again, please...

Similar to the Poetry Foundation site, here's another concise general information page on Dickinson's life and work.

Dickinson's "Music"

A thoughtful blog entry from poet Jessica Smith.

Electronic Archives

The Dickinson Electronic Archives is an online center dedicated to Dickinson's work. It features rare images of writing by Dickinson, her family and friends, as well as transcriptions of the faint, hard-to-read 19th century script. Unfortunately, you have to have a password to access some materials, but you can still find enough on here to sate your curiosity (or your research requirements).

Emily Dickinson Museum

The museum's website includes a solid biography, some videos, and other resources.

Video

"In horrid - hooting stanza -"

Watch the real Hogwarts Express leave the station. It really does make crazy hooting sounds.

"And neigh like Boanerges -"

Watch a steam train zip by, and listen to it whistle.

Emily Dickinson Hoedown

One group sets out to prove that you can sing any Emily Dickinson poem to "The Yellow Rose of Texas," no matter how grim the poem is (in this case, the poem is "I felt a Funeral in my Brain")

Audio

Poetry Speaks Preview

This "preview" allows you to hear an almost-complete professional reading the poem.

Images

The Most Famous Train of (Our) Time

The image of the railway train that pops into many of our heads is the Hogwarts Express!

Putting a Face to the Name

Here's the only known photograph of Emily Dickinson.

Historical Documents

Whitman's Take on the Locomotive

Here's another famous poem about the arrival of the train, from Dickinson's contemporary, Walt Whitman.

Books

All of Everything, in One Place

The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, edited by Thomas H. Johnson.

From the Poet's Hand

Check out The Manuscript Books of Emily Dickinson, an awesome edition that includes facsimiles of all of Dickinson's handwritten pages.

For Very Ambitious Readers...

Check out the Google Books preview for Dickinson scholar Domnhall Mitchell's book, which features a whole chapter about this poem.

Helen Vendler on "I like to see it lap the Miles"

Superstar poetry scholar Helen Vendler offers an elegant and brief commentary on the poem in her book, Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
back to top