Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Quotes

Quote #4

On a fine autumnal afternoon, Ichabod, in pensive mood, sat enthroned on the lofty stool whence he usually watched all the concerns of his little literary realm. In his hand he swayed a ferule, that sceptre of despotic power; the birch of justice reposed on three nails, behind the throne, a constant terror to evil doers […] (1.32)

Ichabod's classroom is a bit like a warzone, too. Ichabod is holding down the fort, preventing any revolutions from rising up.

Quote #5

Brom, who had a degree of rough chivalry in his nature, would fain have carried matters to open warfare, and have settled their pretensions to the lady, according to the mode of those most concise and simple reasoners, the knights-errant of yore—by single combat; but Ichabod was too conscious of the superior might of his adversary to enter the lists against him. (1.31)

Irving brings us back to those days when knights jousted and quests took up most of their time, but Ichabod doesn't want to play along. He prefers less competitive time periods, it seems. Why is he such a wuss?

Quote #6

That he might make his appearance before his mistress in the true style of a cavalier, he borrowed a horse from the farmer with whom he was domiciliated, a choleric old Dutchman, of the name of Hans Van Ripper, and, thus gallantly mounted, issued forth, like a knight-errant in quest of adventures. (1.34)

Right. Just like borrowing your friend's Escalade makes you rich and not just a poser. Man, Ichabod really doesn't know how to make a name for himself.

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