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The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

by C.S. Lewis

Cair Paravel

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

Cair Paravel is a palace on the eastern coast of Narnia, described as the true capital of the land and the place where the four Pevensie children will reign as Kings and Queens of Narnia. Cair Paravel is as far east as you can get and still be in the land of Narnia instead of in the ocean. This seems to be important, because the east is somewhat holy – Aslan's father, the Emperor, is supposed to be Beyond-the-Sea, so Cair Paravel is made to commune with him. Cair Paravel also represents a juncture between the natural world and the man-made one; although it is a palace, with a throne room and a court, the eastern door opens right onto the sea and mermaids and mermen are able to swim close enough to the castle steps for their singing to be heard within.

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