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The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

by C.S. Lewis

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Analysis

Literary Devices in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

There's lots of magic in Narnia, but there are two bits of magic that are particularly important for the plot: the Deep Magic from the Dawn of Time and the Deeper Magic from Before the Dawn of Time...

Setting

Most of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe takes place in the fantastic land of Narnia, which Lucy and her siblings reach through a magical wardrobe. Narnia is everything we've come to expect f...

Narrator Point of View

Usually, third-person omniscient narration is pretty straightforward. Our storyteller has a bird's-eye view of everything that's happening in the story and can dive down into any character's thoug...

Genre

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is recognized around the world as classic children's literature. C.S. Lewis wrote it for a child audience and dedicated it to his goddaughter, Lucy Barfield....

Tone

One of the things that has made The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe such a successful book is C.S. Lewis's ability to balance his didactic message about the Christian faith with a lighthearted to...

Writing Style

In general, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is written in simple, plain language that many child readers can understand. (It makes a great "early chapter book" for developing readers.) Yet...

What's Up With the Title?

As titles go, this one follows the same formula as that classic Western, The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. We've got the good – the Lion, Aslan, who stands for truth, beauty, compassion, and ever...

What's Up With the Ending?

There are really two parts to the ending of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. The first is the unsurprising one: Good triumphs over Evil and everything works out for the best. Although we f...

Tough-o-Meter

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is a pretty straightforward book to read. The prose itself is relatively easy, with short sentences and simple vocabulary, although there might be a few unusu...

Plot Analysis

Lucy discovers a gateway through the wardrobe to the magical world of Narnia.This is where it all begins: Lucy's curiosity leads her to the amazing discovery that an old wardrobe, in a spare room i...

Booker's Seven Basic Plots Analysis

Lucy finds a way into the magical world of Narnia through the wardrobe.The "fall" into the other world happens in stages in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. First Lucy finds her way through...

Three-Act Plot Analysis

Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy arrive in Narnia, discover that their friend Mr. Tumnus has been arrested, and decide that they must rescue him. Edmund betrays his brother and sisters to the evil W...

Trivia

C.S. Lewis dedicated The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe to his goddaughter, Lucy Barfield, and used her name for one of the main characters (source).C.S. Lewis wrote in his short essay "It All B...

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