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Quotes

Quote #4

It would have been a pretty enough scene to look at it through a window from a comfortable armchair; and even as things were, Lucy enjoyed it at first. But as they went on walking and walking – and walking – and as the sack she was carrying felt heavier and heavier, she began to wonder how she was going to keep up at all. (10.20)

The long trek that Lucy, along with Peter, Susan, and the Beavers, must endure through the woods reminds us that the natural world is harsh and unforgiving; it might be picturesque for a little while, but it demands rigor and toughness from travelers.

Quote #5

And soon Edmund noticed that the snow which splashed against them as they rushed through it was much wetter than it had been all last night. At the same time he noticed that he was feeling much less cold. It was also becoming foggy. In fact every minute it grew both foggier and warmer. And the sledge was not running nearly as well as it had been running up till now. (11.22)

When Aslan begins to break the spell of the Witch's winter, it becomes more difficult for her to move around the land, even from a simple logistical standpoint.

Quote #6

The children were walking on hour after hour into what seemed a delicious dream. Long ago they had left the coats behind them. And by now they had even stopped saying to one another, "Look! There's a kingfisher!" or "I say, bluebells!" or "What was that lovely smell?" or "Just listen to that thrush!" They walked on in silence drinking it all in, passing through patches of warm sunlight into cool, green thickets and out again into wide mossy glades where tall elms raised the leafy roof far overhead, and then into dense masses of flowering currant and among hawthorn bushes where the sweet smell was almost overpowering. (12.1)

Peter, Susan, and Lucy have an innate appreciation for the beauties of nature.

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