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Little Women

Little Women

by Louisa May Alcott

Marriage Quotes Page 4

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #10

At twenty-five, girls begin to talk about being old maids, but secretly resolve that they never will be. At thirty they say nothing about it, but quietly accept the fact, and if sensible, console themselves by remembering that they have twenty more useful, happy years, in which they may be learning to grow old gracefully. Don't laugh at the spinsters, dear girls, for often very tender, tragic romances are hidden away in the hearts that beat so quietly under the sober gowns, and many silent sacrifices of youth, health, ambition, love itself, make the faded faces beautiful in God's sight. Even the sad, sour sisters should be kindly dealt with, because they have missed the sweetest part of life, if for no other reason. And looking at them with compassion, not contempt, girls in their bloom should remember that they too may miss the blossom time. That rosy cheeks don't last forever, that silver threads will come in the bonnie brown hair, and that, by-and-by, kindness and respect will be as sweet as love and admiration now. (43.3)

Alcott was herself a "spinster" or "old maid" – a woman who never married. She lived to be 51, raised her niece, cared for her aging father, wrote many bestselling books, and moved in fascinating intellectual circles. She wrote in her diary that "liberty is a better husband than love" for many women. It's interesting to contrast her life with the pity that her narrator feels for old maids in this passage.

Quote #11

It was certainly proposing under difficulties, for even if he had desired to do so, Mr. Bhaer could not go down upon his knees, on account of the mud. Neither could he offer Jo his hand, except figuratively, for both were full. Much less could he indulge in tender remonstrations in the open street, though he was near it. So the only way in which he could express his rapture was to look at her, with an expression which glorified his face to such a degree that there actually seemed to be little rainbows in the drops that sparkled on his beard. If he had not loved Jo very much, I don't think he could have done it then, for she looked far from lovely, with her skirts in a deplorable state, her rubber boots splashed to the ankle, and her bonnet a ruin. Fortunately, Mr. Bhaer considered her the most beautiful woman living, and she found him more "Jove-like" than ever, though his hatbrim was quite limp with the little rills trickling thence upon his shoulders (for he held the umbrella all over Jo), and every finger of his gloves needed mending. (46.70)

Alcott deliberately makes both Jo and Professor Bhaer completely unromantic in this scene. In fact, they're almost comical in their shabbiness. Their love, however, is no less real because it lacks little details – like him going down on one knee, or her looking radiantly beautiful.

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