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Quotes

Quote #1

In point of fact, there might have been no Lolita at all had I not loved, one summer, an initial girl-child. (1.1.3)

Humbert often describes Lolita as his own creation, his figment of nymphet perfection. We need to be careful as readers, because all we know of Lolita comes from him.

Quote #2

The spiritual and the physical had been blended in us with a perfection that must remain incomprehensible to the matter-of-fact, crude, standard-brained youngsters of today. (1.4.2)

Humbert has very romantic ideas about his first love. He also doesn't think much of the manners of children. How do these two points work together?

Quote #3

Now I wish to introduce the following idea. Between the age limits of nine and fourteen there occur maidens who, to certain bewitched travelers, twice or many times older than they, reveal their true nature which is not human, but nymphic (that is, demoniac); and these chosen creatures I propose to designate as "nymphets." (1.5.5)

Humbert's definition of nymphet is very precise. He wants to make sure that the reader knows exactly the kind of girl he adores. Why is this information so important to him? Isn't it incriminating?

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