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Lord of the Flies

Lord of the Flies

by

William Golding

 Table of Contents

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Lord of the Flies Chapter 5 Quotes

How we cite the quotes:
(Chapter.Paragraph)

Piggy >

Quote 4

"Life […] is scientific, that's what it is. In a year or two when the world is over they'll be traveling to Mars and back. I know there isn't no beast—not with claws and all that I mean—but I know there isn't no fear either."

[…]

"Unless we get frightened of people." (5.99, 104)

There's nothing to be afraid of, says Piggy—unless we start to fear other people. Trust rational, scientific Piggy to understand.

>

Quote 5

“Maybe […] there is a beast

[…]

What I mean is… maybe it's only us.” (5.183-195)

Simon and Piggy come to equal-but-opposite conclusions. Piggy has a kind of rational, external, empirical attitude—we're afraid of each other. Simon has a more spiritual insight: it's not each other we need to be afraid of, but ourselves. Subtle? Sure. But it's an important difference.

Jack > Ralph

Quote 6

Jack's face swam near him.

"And you shut up! Who are you, anyway? Sitting there telling people what to do. You can't hunt, you can't sing—"

"I'm chief. I was chosen."

"Why should choosing make any difference? Just giving orders that don't make any sense—" (5.238-241)

In case you haven't gotten it by now, Golding spells it out for us: Jack represents an autocratic government, where power is taken; and Ralph represents democratic governments, where power is given.

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