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Lord of the Flies

Lord of the Flies

by William Golding

Innocence Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

"You got your small fire all right." […] the boys were falling still and silent, feeling the beginnings of awe at the power set free below them. (2.210)

Piggy points out that the boys have set half the island on fire, and, like little arsonists, everyone goes nuts until they realize that this is Not Good. Oops. But it seems like they also realize that they have power for the first time in their lives. No one's going to take away their TV privileges for burning up the firewood. Is this a loss of innocence? Acting without fear of punishment sounds like it to us.

Quote #2

Then, amid the roar of bees in the afternoon sunlight, Simon found for [the littluns] the fruit they could not reach, pulled off the choicest from up in the foliage, passed them back down to the endless, outstretched hands. (3.138)

Talk about innocent: Simon is the only one who bothers helping the littluns out, totally disregarding all the savage power struggles going on behind his back. (Also, notice the difference between Simon innocently picking fruit—how Edenic—and Jack killing a boar?)

Quote #3

Even the sounds of nightmare from the other shelters no longer reached him, for he was back to where came from, feeding the ponies with sugar over the garden wall. (6.42)

When Ralph dreams, he dreams about feeding sugar to ponies. When he wakes up, the twins are babbling about the beast. Yep, sounds like a loss of innocence to us.

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