Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Quotes

Quote #4

From youthful enthusiasm he had moved to a position that he himself defined as fatalistic humanism:  "Each man is master of his own death, and all that we can do when the time comes is to help him die without fear of pain."  (1.24)

"Fatalistic" seems like a good way to describe this novel's approach to death.  We're constantly being reminded of its inevitability.

Quote #5

He was awakened by sadness.  Not the sadness he had felt that morning when he stood before the corpse of his friend, but the invisible cloud that would saturate his soul after his siesta and which he interpreted as divine notification that he was living his final afternoons.  (1.105)

Dr. Urbino seems to have some sort of premonition of his impending death.

Quote #6

At eighty-one years of age he had enough lucidity to realize that he was attached to this world by a few slender threads that could break painlessly with a simple change of position while he slept, and if he did all he could to keep those threads intact, it was because of his terror of not finding God in the darkness of death.  (1.106)

Are you ready, guys?  Death can come AT ANY MOMENT for Dr. Urbino.  He's VERY FRAGILE!  Gee, we wonder what's going to happen?

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