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Analysis: Allusions

When authors refer to other great works, people, and events, it’s usually not accidental. Put on your super-sleuth hat and figure out why.

Mythological References

  • Cupid (2.1) – the god of love. Kind of the patron saint of this play.
  • Nestor (4.3) – a kind king
  • Argus (3.1) – a giant with 100 eyes
  • Jove (4.3) – god of sky and thunder
  • Juno (4.3) – goddess of marriage
  • Prometheus (4.3) – stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals
  • Apollo (4.3) – god of light, the sun, the arts
  • The Sphinx (4.3) – a mysterious, riddling lion with a human head
  • Mercury (5.2) – messenger god
  • Ajax (4.3) – famous warrior
  • Hector (5.2) – famous warrior, Ajax's foe
  • Hercules (1.2) – strongman and son of Zeus

Biblical References

  • Samson (1.2) – a strong man betrayed by a woman
  • Solomon (1.2) – a wise king

Historical References

  • Timon (4.3) – legendary misanthrope
  • Pompey (5.2) – great Roman politician and warrior
  • Alexander (5.2) – great Greek military man
  • Judas Maccabeus (5.2) – great warrior in Jewish history

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