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Love's Labour's Lost Time Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Act.Scene.Line)

Quote #1

KING
When, spite of cormorant devouring time,
Th' endeavor of this present breath may buy
That honor which shall bate his scythe's keen edge
And make us heirs of all eternity. (1.1.4-7)

The King's main motivation for this three-year-fast-and-study plan seems to be immortal fame, not knowledge.

Quote #2

KING
The
time when? About the sixth hour, when beasts most
graze, birds best peck, and men sit down to that
nourishment which is called supper.
(1.1.238-241)

This part of Armado's letter underscores the play's motif that there are appropriate times for all actions.

Quote #3

ARMADO
Why 'tough signior'? Why 'tough signior'?
BOY
Why 'tender juvenal'? Why 'tender juvenal'?
ARMADO
I spoke it 'tender juvenal' as a congruent
epitheton appertaining to thy young days, which
we may nominate 'tender.'
BOY
And I 'tough signior' as an appurtenant title to
your old time, which we may name 'tough.' (1.2.11-17)

A reliable source of humor in the play is Moth's condescension to his master.

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