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Macbeth Act 5, Scene 3 Summary

  • Macbeth pumped for battle. Thanks to the sisters' prophecies, he's pretty confident that he can't be beat.
  • Just then, a messenger enters with the doubtful and fearful news that there are ten thousand somethings marching to Dunsinane.
    Somethings? That doesn't sound good.
  • Macbeth guesses that the somethings are geese.
    Seriously, dude?
  • LOL, good try. Actually, they're men coming to kill you.
  • Macbeth starts to get a little worried. He's had a good run, but it's looking like he won't be relaxing in a peaceful old age.
  • Lady Macbeth isn't doing too well, either. The doctor reports she isn't sick so much as she is plagued by ill fantasies. Macbeth suggests that the doctor cure her, sooner rather than later.
  • The doctor replies that the woman's got to fix herself.
  • By the way, asks Macbeth—does the doctor have the means to purge the English from the countryside of Scotland?
  • Nope. No amount of money could convince him to stay near the madhouse of Dunsinane.

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