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Gospel of Matthew Allusions & Cultural References

Technically, the Bible is probably the most alluded to work, ever. Let's take a closer look.

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
With one of the most beloved Christ-figures in literature, C.S. Lewis's book gives us one lion of a metaphor depicting the ministry and passion of Jesus. Lewis also uses the Narnia cornerstone as a commentary on Christian virtues. But as a kid, it's easier to just focus on the adventure.

Lord of the Flies by William Golding
Hello Simon! Or should we say Jesus? Portraying another Christ-figure within a great work of literature, Lord of the Flies speaks volumes on the topic of human nature.

Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling
This one's definitely up for debate, but some people, like the folks over at Emory University, have compared the popular wizard to the Son of God.

The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner
In this doozy, Faulkner shouts out to Matthew with his Easter sermon, and in doing so, calls attention to Christ-figure, Benjy.

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis
Now onto the comic relief. While the comic strip isn't heavily focused on religious themes, its title does come directly from Matthew 7:6.

"The Gift of the Magi" by O. Henry
This short story shows how love is the greatest gift that can be given. And how the wise men basically invented Christmas presents.

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